Carbon Monoxide in Alaska

 

The health threat from exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) is most serious for children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those who suffer from cardiovascular disease, but at higher levels of exposure, healthy individuals are also affected. Visual impairment, reduced work capacity, reduced manual dexterity, poor learning ability, and difficulty in performing complex tasks are all associated with exposure to elevated CO levels.

General Information:
Basic CO Information
Health Impact
Sources of Carbon Monoxide:
Indoor Emissions
Outdoor Emissions
Additional Information:
Affected communities
Projects and Reports
Protecting your family from Carbon Monoxide
State law (Sec. 18.70.095)

Requires CO alarms to be installed in most dwellings that have carbon-based fuel appliances, including single-family houses, duplexes, apartments, dormitories or group homes. The requirement will also apply to residences that have an attached garage or carport or that are adjacent to a parking space.

Contact Information:

Cindy Heil, Program Manager
Air Non-Point & Mobile Sources
Phone: 907-269-7579
email: cindy.heil@alaska.gov