How "Bad" Is The Air?

Fairbanks State Office Building & NCORE - Monitoring Data

The State Office Building monitor was used to originally designate the FNSB PM2.5 Nonattainment Area in 2009. The charts below show historical data from this monitor and the downtown Fairbanks NCORE monitor located nearby. The Alaska Air Monitoring Plan contains more information about these monitors.

 

Note: The vertical axis of these charts extends to 100 µg/m3.


The following graphs show the 24-hour averaged PM2.5 concentrations measured at the Fairbanks State Office Building from 2014 through 2000. Graphs for 2014 through 2011 also include concentrations monitored at the NCORE site using lighter colors.



2016 *Preliminary


The 2016 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 g/m3 with the exception of two days in February, one day in October, and four days in December. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 41.5 g/m3 at the State Office Building monitor and 32.4 g/m3 at the NCORE monitor.



2015


The 2015 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 g/m3 with the exception of two values in January and two values in February. The exceedances measured at both monitors in June and July were caused by wildfire smoke, an event that is going to be submitted as an Exceptional Event to EPA and will most likely not be used to calculate NAAQS compliance. The 98th percentile concentration was 35.3 g/m3 at the State Office Building monitor and 36.7 g/m3 at the NCORE monitor.



2014


The 2014 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 g/m3 with the exception of one value in January and one value in February. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 34.5 g/m3 at the State Office Building monitor and 31.6 g/m3 at the NCORE monitor.



2013


The 2013 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 g/m3 with the exception of one value in March and two values in December. The exceedance measured at both monitors in June was caused by wildfire smoke, an event that is going to be submitted as an Exceptional Event to EPA and will most likely not be used to calculate NAAQS compliance. The 98th percentile concentration was 36.3 g/m3 at the State Office Building Monitor and 36.2 g/m3 at the NCORE monitor.



2012


The 2012 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3with the exception of one value in January, 3 values in November, and 3 values in December. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 49.6 g/m3 at the State Office Building Monitor and 50.0 g/m3 at the NCORE monitor.



2011


The 2011 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3 with the exception of one vaule in January, February, and March and one value in November. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 38 g/m3 at the State Office Building Monitor and 33.1 g/m3 at the NCORE monitor.



2010


The 2010 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3 with multiple exceptions: the PM2.5 concentration exceeded the standard several times in January, once in July, and several times in December. The exceedance in July was caused by wildfire smoke, an event that qualified as an “Exceptional Event” and was not used to calculate NAAQS compliance. The 98th percentile concentration was 51.8 µg/m3.



2009


The 2009 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3 with multiple exceptions: the PM2.5 concentration exceeded the standard in July and Agust as well as in January, November, and December. The July and Agust exceedances, however, were caused by wildfire smoke, an event that qualified as an “Exceptional Event” and these concentrations were not included in determining compliance with the NAAQS. The 98th percentile concentration was 51 µg/m3.



2008


The 2008 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3 with the exception of seven values in January, November, and December. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 46.7 µg/m3.



2007


The 2007 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 2006 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3 with the exception of one value in December. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 33.1 µg/m3.



2006


NOTE: In 2006 EPA strengthened the National Ambient Air Quality Standard by lowering the concentration to 35 µg/m3. The 2006 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations measured were below the new 24-hour NAAQS of 35 µg/m3 with the exception of four values in January and February. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 42.2 µg/m3. While the 98th percentile was roughly the same level as in previous years, this year it exceeded the NAAQS, because of the changes to the standards.



2005


The 2005 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3. The State classified several values in June, July, and Agust as Exceptional Events even though they did not exceed the NAAQS. The 98th percentile concentration was 40.6 µg/m3, below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3.



2004


The 2004 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3 with multiple exceptions: the PM2.5 concentration exceeded the standard in June, July, Agust, and September. These exceedances, however, were caused by wildfire smoke, an event that qualified as an “Exceptional Event” and these concentrations were not included in determining compliance with the NAAQS. The 98th percentile concentration was 46.2 µg/m3, below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3.



2003


The 2003 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were all below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 32.7 µg/m3, below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3.



2002


The 2002 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3 with one exception: the PM2.5 concentration exceeded the standard in July. The exceedance in July, however, was caused by wildfire smoke, an event that qualified as an “Exceptional Event” and was not included in calculations of the 98th percentile concentration. The 98th percentile concentration was 43.4 µg/m3.



2001


The 2001 PM2.5 24-hour concentrations were all below the 1997 24-hour NAAQS of 65 µg/m3. There were no Exceptional Events documented this year. The 98th percentile concentration was 43.4 µg/m3.



2000


The 2000 PM2.5 concentrations exhibited a distribution that is typical of Fairbanks air quality – higher concentrations in winter when air pollution is trapped by inversion. The PM2.5 24-hour concentrations in 2000 were below the 1997 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 65 µg/m3 with two exceptions: the PM2.5 concentration exceeded the standard in January and again in July. The exceedance in July, however, was caused by wildfire smoke, an event that qualified as an “Exceptional Event” and for which the State can request a waiver from EPA to exclude these values from the dataset used to calculate NAAQS compliance. If EPA agrees with the State’s request, the Exceptional Event concentrations will not be included in any calculations or comparisons to the NAAQS. The 98th percentile concentration was 46.3 µg/m3.



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