Division of Spill Prevention and Response

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Site Report: Port Heiden WP02 Black Lagoon


Site Name: Port Heiden WP02 Black Lagoon
Address: Black Lagoon aka AOC01, Port Heiden, AK 99549
File Number: 2637.38.002.08
Hazard ID: 186
Status: Active
Staff: Louis Howard, 9072697552 louis.howard@alaska.gov
Latitude: 56.976736
Longitude: -158.658185
Horizontal Datum:NAD83


We make every effort to ensure the data presented here is accurate based on the best available information currently on file with DEC. It is therefore subject to change as new information becomes available. We recommend contacting the assigned project staff prior to making decisions based on this information.


Problems/Comments

Wastewater, petroleum products and other liquid wastes were discharged into a floor drain in the former composite building (garage), piped 500 feet downslope to the west, and discharged into a bermed ponding area referred to as the "black lagoon". The ponding area was described as being about 25' by 25' and had an overflow outlet that drained to the west into an area approximately 40' by 30' that was also bermed. Petroleum and possibly solvent contamianted soil is present in the former ponding area. WP002-POL Waste Disposal Pit No. 1 (Black Lagoon Outfall) Formerly known as Area of Concern (AOC01). RCRA EPA ID#AK0210890091 Hazardous waste activity: generator 1. CERCLA AK8570028698; Site located about 100 miles NE of Cold Bay, on the north side of Alaska Peninsula.



Action Information

Action Date Action Description DEC Staff
9/30/1987 Update or Other Action In preparation of the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) cleanup in 1987, USACE collected and analyzed soil samples from the Black Lagoon Outfall. The Black Lagoon Outfall consisted of an approximately 25-foot by 25-foot ponding area with an overflow outlet which drained to the west into an approximately 43-foot by 30-foot bermed area. In 1987, four samples were collected from the Black Lagoon Outfall, two from each of the ponds and two from the distressed vegetation area soils. The samples were analyzed for PCBs by USEPA Method 8080, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by USEPA Method 8240, SVOCs by USEPA Method 8270, and flashpoint. Fuels, PCBs, and chlorinated solvents were all detected at low concentrations. Louis Howard
9/30/1988 Update or Other Action In preparation of the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) cleanup in 1989, USACE collected and analyzed soil samples from the Black Lagoon Outfall. The Black Lagoon Outfall consisted of an approximately 25-foot by 25-foot ponding area with an overflow outlet which drained to the west into an approximately 43-foot by 30-foot bermed area. In 1988, 16 samples were collected and tested for VOCs by USEPA Method 8020 and selected samples were analyzed for Extraction Procedure Toxicity Test (EP TOX) metals by USEPA Method 1310. The samples were collected along three lines that converged approximately 50 feet west of the northwest corner of the overflow pond. All three lines were north of the holding ponds. Only two of the samples had detectable levels of VOCs. None of the samples contained detectable levels of EP TOX metals. Louis Howard
9/14/1990 Update or Other Action Larry Wilkinson, Manager of Philip Environmental, Inc. (formerly Northwest EnviroServices, Inc.) stated that in 1990 NWES performed hazardous waste identification and removal from Fort Morrow and the RRS. In the vicinity of the RRS, two areas of contaminated soil remained the black lagoon and the gray lagoon. Approximately 20,000 cy of contaminated soil remain in place at the black lagoon. In 1990, they trenched down 18 feet bgs before the contamination ended and the subsurface had been reworked and was not m its original stratigraphy. Impacted soil was encountered at 4 to 5 feet bgs to approximately 18 feet bgs. Impacted soil concentrations were highest m the center and decreased in all directions radially above, below, and around all sides. The gray lagoon area was saturated with POLs from the surface to a depth of approximately 12 feet bgs. Vegetation was visibly stressed at the gray lagoon. In 1991, two diesel storage tanks and their concrete foundation(s) were removed in the vicinity of the Native village of Meshik near the coastline. Some soil was removed and then returned to the excavation. In 1992, soil was removed until groundwater was encountered Free product was visible on the groundwater. Approximately 10 feet of soil was left intact between the excavation and the ocean to confine the contamination. Excavated soil was processed through an on-site thermal remedtatlon unit and replaced in the excavation. A storm has since breached the sea wall in the vicinity of the tanks and may have exposed contaminants to the ocean. Louis Howard
9/30/1990 Update or Other Action During the 1990 DERP cleanup, surface samples were collected and four trenches were excavated in the Black Lagoon Outfall to delineate the extent of impacted soil. Soil samples were analyzed and cross-sections drawn. Approximately 89 samples were analyzed for TPH. Twenty-two of those samples were also analyzed for PCBs. Analytical results varied from ND to 67,000 mg/Kg for TPH. Some of the data from 1990 were reportedly from unknown locations. Samples analyzed for PCBs were all ND. The extent of impacted soil with greater than 5,000 mg/Kg TPH was estimated in each trench. Impacted soil with greater than 5,000 mg/Kg TPH was found locally at the surface and to a depth of 12 feet bgs. Approximately 4,000 cy of impacted soil with TPH concentrations above 5,000 mg/Kg was estimated to remain in the Black Lagoon Outfall. Louis Howard
6/20/1991 Update or Other Action Letter from Jennifer Roberts Fed. Fac. Coordinator-Southcentral Regional Office to Louis R. Pylant Lt. Col. COE RE: FUDS Risk Analysis Dated June 19, 1991. The Department has reviewed the Final Risk Analysis for Alternative Cleanup Levels at Port Heiden, Alaska, submitted by your department on June 19, 1991. The risk analysis adequately addresses the concerns generated by utilizing a cleanup level of 5,000 parts per million total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) for remote areas of the Port Heiden Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) cleanup. (Area not considered remote-e.g. AOC06 POL Tank Farm near populated areas). This 5,000 ppm does not include benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and total xylenes. It is my understanding that the components have volatilized off and are no longer an issue. This letter approves of the work proposed in the Final Risk Analysis with a remote site-specific cleanup level of 5,000 ppm (mg/kg) for TPH. (CC'd Max Schwenne, Ron Godden, and Eileen Olsen). Jennifer Roberts
1/31/1994 Update or Other Action Preliminary Assessment for facility identified POL contaminated soil remaining at Port Heiden: The tank rings and pipeline at Meshik, the Black Lagoon at the WACS site, and the gray lagoon at the WACS site. The black lagoon is a drain outfall area west of the composite building on the WACS site. The term "lagoon" refers to the observation that standing water can be temporarily found in the area following heavy rains or spring snowmelt. Extensive soil sampling has found contamination to 40,000 ppm of TPH, volatiles in the low parts-per-billion range, no PCBs, and no polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbqns. Transects cut into the area found soils contaminated at above 5,000 ppm of TPH at the 12-foot depth, the vertical extent of the cuts. The contractor estimated that about 4,000 cubic yards of soil above 5,000 ppm of TPH exist in the black lagoon source. Plume boundaries were not defined completely. Louis Howard
4/12/1994 Update or Other Action EPA Region 10 sent letter to USAF Lt. Colonel Rodney L. Hunt 11th CEOS. The letter was to inform the Air Force that EPA Region 10 has completed the review of the Preliminary Assessment (PA) report for the Port Heiden White Alice Communication site located near Port Heiden, Alaska. The PA and supplemental information have been evaluated in accordance with 40 CFR Part 300 Appendix A, which is EPA's Hazard Ranking System (HRS) used to evaluate federal facilities for inclusion on the National Priorities List (NPL). From our evaluation, EPA has determined that the facility does not score high enough to be proposed for inclusion on the NPL. Therefore, a recommendation of no further remedial action planned (NFRAP) on the EPA's part will be included in our Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket tracking system. If new or additional information to be proposed for the NPL, EPA must reevaluate your facility accordingly. EPA's NFRAP designation does not relieve your facility from complying with appropriate Alaska state regulations. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, Section 120(a) (4) requires federal facilities to comply with state cleanup requirements and standards when not listed on the NPL. This facility will not be removed from the Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket, but as noted earlier, will be listed for no further action by EPA. Mark Adar Federal Facilities, Site Assessment Manager. Louis Howard
3/13/1996 Update or Other Action DEC received the Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection Report Port Heiden Radio Relay Site, dated March 1996, by EMCON for the Air Force. The report describes sampling results from 1990 as documenting petroleum contaminated soil to more than 12' below ground and estimated more than 4,000 cubic yards of soil containing petroleum levels above 5,000 mg/kg. AOC01 (black lagoon) Southwest of OT001 is a petroleum waste area named the black lagoon. Petroleum wastes were piped from the composite building and discharged to this area. Soil sample analytical results indicate that there are approximately 4,000 cubic yards (cy) of TPH-impacted soil above the 5,000 ppm cleanup level Analytical results of EP TOX metals were not detected (ND) and PCBs were detected below the cleanup level of 25 ppm Remediation of this soil is recommended to meet the TPH cleanup level. John Halverson
12/29/1997 Update or Other Action Management Action Plan DACA85-95-D-0010, D.O. No. 16 is intended to be a strategic document integrating the Environmental Restoration Program {ERP) into a series of response actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Due to the dynamics inherent in the strategic planning process, the MAP represents a "snapshot" in time, requiring periodic updating to remain useful. This MAP does the following: • Describes the environmental response objectives, the MAP purpose, and a brief history of the installation (Chapter 1), Identifies all known contaminated sites; environmental condition of property; real property, off-base facilities and properties; and non-Air Force tenants (Chapter 2); Summarizes the status of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) and regulatory agreements (if applicable); IRP Sites; Areas of Concern (AOCs); and community relations program Chapter 3); Describes the installation-wide strategy for environmental restoration through the definition of zones (including current scope of removal and remedial activities associated with, or to be completed for, each), and contracting and hiring strategy (Chapter 4), and • Provides a Master Schedule of planned and anticipated activities to be performed throughout the duration of the ERP(Chapter 5). All areas at the Port Heiden RRS have been assigned to one of seven environmental condition of property categories based on site characterization and remediation efforts to date. AOC01:Category 6. Areas where storage, release, or disposal of hazardous substances or petroleum products has occurred, but required response initiatives have not yet been implemented. The Black Lagoon (AOC01), the Gray Lagoon (AOC02), and the POL Tank Farm (AOC06) are in this category. Louis Howard
10/28/1999 Site Added to Database POL and solvents. Gretchen Pikul
1/30/2001 Update or Other Action Final Site Investigation, Port Heiden RRS, Alaska (dated July 2000) – no draft version was received for ADEC review prior to the final version being submitted – this investigation was performed to update the relative risk evaluation for select sites at Port Heiden and Driftwood Bay RRS, however, a rock slide blocked access to 2 of the sites at Driftwood Bay and therefore the investigation was not conducted at 2 of the selected sites – pending funding, the samples may be collected this field season Gretchen Pikul
6/13/2002 Update or Other Action DEC received a fax and letter from the Lake and Pennisula Borough and the City of Port Heiden about a phone call from an annonymous worked who reported dumping drums of hazardous material into a trench on the northwest side of the former White Alice site and that the chemicals could cause health problems for the villlagers. The letters requested DEC assistance in following up on the call and ensuring the former military sites are cleaned up properly. John Halverson
6/19/2002 Update or Other Action DEC sent letter to the Corps of Engineers and the 611 CES (Air Force) informing them on the community concerns and asking for cooperation in compling the site records, conducting a site inspection and community meeting, and ensuring the sites are adequately characterized and cleaned up. John Halverson
9/5/2002 Meeting or Teleconference Held DEC staff conducted a site inspection and particpated in a public meeting with the Corps of Engineers and the 611 CES (Air Force). Many residents expressed concern over health problems and their thoughts that there may be a link between past military activities and health problems. Scott Anderson, Tribal Environmental Coordinator and Lynn Carlson helped coordinate the meeting and site inspections. The surface cleanup work appears to have been very thorough and the landfills are adequately covered. Subsurface characterization is needed. Residents want their water wells sampled and had applied for a grant from TASWER to conduct the sampling. DEC, the Corps and Air Force staff said they would work together to help get wells sampled. John Halverson
9/18/2002 Update or Other Action After conducting the site visit earlier this month, staff researched options for groundwater characterization at Port Heiden and found out the the City of Port Heiden is on the Village Safe Water program's list for a Water and Wastewater Feasibility Study in FY03. The scope calls for evaluating the current systems, the aquifers, water use and estimated future needs. It may include some limited testing, but not sampling 30 wells; it is a civil works project rather than environmental. Staff is working with the Corps of Engineers to sample existing wells under the Native American Lands Environmental Mitigation Program (NALEMP). John Halverson
4/30/2003 Meeting or Teleconference Held DEC and the Air Force participated in a public meeting at Port Heiden to update the community on Air Force plans for conducting remedial investigation work in 2004 and completing a proposed plan, record of decision and implementing a remedy by 2007. The Corps does not have work planned for Fort Morrow until 2011, but will re-evaluate the schedule based on any new information (water well sample results). John Halverson
6/5/2003 Update or Other Action Keres Environmental is sampling all water wells in Port Heiden under the Native American Lands Environmental Mitigation Program (NALEMP). Sampling plans were reviewed by DEC and the Corps and each well will be tested for VOC, PAHs, PCBs, and metals. Sampling will be conducted during the first week of June and results are anticipated by early August. John Halverson
11/6/2003 Update or Other Action Keres Environmental sampled 42 domestic (private) wells out of 52 wells identified in Port Heiden during June 2003 under the Native American Lands Environmental Mitigation Program (NALEMP). The 42 domestic wells were the only ones that were either functioning or accessible for sampling. Samples were analyzed for: diesel range organics (DRO), gasoline range organics (GRO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), via the selective ion method (SIM), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and safe drinking water act (SDWA) primary metals plus lead, iron, and copper. The first and second areas chosen for potential impact identified by the community members based on their location relative to the Port Heiden housing areas were located north and south of the road to Annie Christensen's house. The third is west of the New Meshik Mall, and the fourth is north of the new HUD area toward the west end, and the fifth is on the northeast side of the road from new HUD to the airport. Additionally, an old drum storage area is located north and west of the hazardous waste site on either side of an unnamed community road. The drum site is also of interest to the community. The other areas of interest and the other identified hazardous waste site are not located near housing and generally lie west/northwest of Port Heiden. Only six organic compounds were identified during sampling, ALL were below federal and state maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water. "Maximum contaminant level" or "MCL" means the maximum permissible level of a contaminant in water that is delivered to any user of a public water system. "Contaminant" means a physical, chemical, biological, or radiological substance or material in water that, in sufficient quantity, makes water unfit for human consumption. Arsenic and iron were observed in the analytical results. Arsenic was below the Federal standard of 10 ppb or 10 ug/L (0.010 mg/L) and the State standard of 50 ppb or 50 ug/L (0.050 mg/L). Iron in 29 of the 42 domestic wells sampled exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 0.3 mg/L or 300 ppb (300 ug/L) applicable only to community water systems not private domestic wells. According to the US EPA, National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (NSDWRs or secondary standards) are non-enforceable guidelines regulating contaminants that may cause cosmetic effects (such as skin or tooth discoloration) or aesthetic effects (such as taste, odor, or color) in drinking water. EPA recommends secondary standards to public water systems but does not require public water systems to comply. However, states may choose to adopt them as enforceable standards. State of Alaska defines public water systems as either a: "Class A public water system" means a public water system that (A) is expected to serve, year-round, at least 25 individuals, (B) is expected to serve, year-round, at least 15 residential service connections; or (C) regularly serves the same 25 or more individuals for at least six months of the year; or a (13) "Class B public water system" means a public water system that is not a Class A public water system, and that regularly serves at least 25 individuals each day for at least 60 days of the year; or a (14) "Class C public water system" means a public water system that is not a Class A public water system, a Class B public water system, or a private water system. "Private water system" means a potable water system serving one single family residence or duplex. The department will require a "public water system" to meet the secondary MCLs if the department determines that public health is threatened or that exceeding a secondary MCL is not in the public interest. Groundwater which serves the drinking water wells is not contaminated since 18 AAC 75 states: “contaminated groundwater” means groundwater containing a concentration of a hazardous substance that EXCEEDS the applicable cleanup level determined under the site cleanup rules. John Halverson
5/3/2005 Update or Other Action File number issued 2637.38.002.08 Aggie Blandford
7/22/2005 Site Characterization Report Approved DEC approved the final RI report dated May 2005. The AF property was evaluated in three main areas, the former WACS facility, the pipeline corridor and the former fuel tank farm. Black Lagoon Outfall, Black Lagoon Pipeline, Septic System, and Septic System Pipeline are part of the five exposure areas (FFA 3) developed for the installation. The former facility area has PCB contamination in soil, petroleum contamination in soil and groundwater and TCE contamination in groundwater. Groundwater flows toward the northwest away from the village. Localized areas of petroleum contamination in soil and surface water were found along the pipeline cooridor, with one area near the airport and Frosty Fuels pipeline having groundwater contamiation. The former tank farm area did not have contamination above cleanup levels. Of the 23 surface soil analytical samples collected, four samples contained DRO above the screening criteria of 250 mg/Kg. One duplicate sample also produced results above the screening criteria. The highest result was 12,000 mg/Kg in soil boring BLO-SB-12. PCE was detected above the screening criteria of 0.03 mg/Kg in one sample and its duplicate sample. In the subsurface soil, DRO and PCE were both detected above the screening criteria of 250 mg/Kg and 0.03 mg/Kg, respectively. A total of five subsurface soil samples contained analytes above screening criteria. One duplicate sample also produced results above the screening criteria. DRO was detected above the screening criteria (250 mg/Kg) in a total of five subsurface samples from five soil borings (one from each boring). One duplicate sample also produced results above the screening criteria. The maximum DRO concentration was 2,800 mg/Kg in a soil sample collected from 39 to 41 feet bgs in soil boring BLO-SB-03. Of the 11 groundwater samples that were collected, two contained contaminants above the screening criteria. Contaminants identified included DRO (17 mg/L), RRO (2.3 mg/L), benzene (0.0059 mg/L), and TCE (0.0056 mg/L) found in BLO-MW-01; and DRO (8.9 mg/L) and RRO (2.0 mg/L) found in a groundwater grab sample collected from BLO-SB-13. Screening criteria are 1.5 mg/L for DRO, 1.1 mg/L for RRO, 0.005 mg/L for benzene, and 0.005 mg/L for TCE. Underlying the Black Lagoon Outfall is a smaller benzene, and TCE plume (approximately 100 feet long, 100 feet wide, and at a depth of 50-60 feet bgs). John Halverson
7/22/2005 Risk Assessment Report Approved DEC approved the human health and ecological risk assessments as part of the remedial investigation report. The risk assessments show potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks above acceptable State risk levels for the Former Facility Area. Contaminants of concern exceeding risk based levels include PCBs, TCE, pesticides, PAHs and arsenic (however, arsenic was within background levels). The risk assessments showed negligible risk along the pipeline cooridor and no unacceptable risk at the former tank farm. John Halverson
2/19/2008 Exposure Tracking Model Ranking Initial ranking with ETM completed. Louis Howard
3/27/2009 CERCLA ROD Approved Record of Decision presents the Final Selected Remedy for the source areas listed above at Port Heiden RRS, located in Port Heiden, Alaska. There are some areas contaminated with Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants (POL) at the RRS. The remedies for POL contaminants are not selected in this ROD, but will be addressed in a subsequent work plan submitted in accordance with Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) regulations. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Alaska State Laws and Regulation and in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Groundwater is contaminated with trichloroethylene and benzene. The selected remedy for groundwater is Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). The selected remedy for groundwater applies to the Black Lagoon Outfall Plume and the Former Facility Area Plume, Groundwater monitoring will be conducted in accordance with a plan approved by ADEC and the Air Force to monitor natural attenuation of the plume. As other contaminants (i.e., fuels) in the groundwater breakdown over time, their by-products will help to break down the TCE and benzene. Since groundwater contaminants will be left onsite for many years until cleanup goals are met, institutional controls will be necessary to control human exposure to groundwater. Periodic groundwater monitoring and subsequent data evaluation will be conducted to verify the effectiveness of natural attenuation and that cleanup goals are achieved as discussed below. Evaluation/Compilation of Groundwater Data-After the first five years of groundwater monitoring (performed at a frequency no less than annually during the summer period), the Air Force and ADEC will evaluate the progress of natural attenuation. Wells to be monitored will be determined as part of a Groundwater Monitoring Plan to be submitted to ADEC for coordination and approval. The five-year evaluation will compile, analyze, and review all groundwater data collected, to determine the effectiveness of natural attenuation. If during this evaluation, the data indicates contaminant concentrations in groundwater are not declining as estimated, the Air Force and ADEC may reconsider the remedy decision. One or more of the following observations could lead to reconsideration of the remedy: • Increase in parent contaminant concentrations indicating that other sources may be present; • Concentrations of parent contaminants and/or daughter products may indicate that the estimated cleanup time frames may not be reached; and • Plume of primary contaminants and/or daughter products increases significantly in aerial or vertical extent and/or volume from previous estimates. In the future, if groundwater is removed from the site it must be characterized and managed following regulations applicable at that time. Pursuant to 18 AAC 75.325(i)(1) and 2), ADEC approval is required prior to moving groundwater that is, or has been, subject to the cleanup rules found at 18 AAC 75.325-.370. The Air Force will submit an Institutional Control Performance Report to the ADEC on an annual basis for the first five years post-remedial action in-place. The frequency of the Institutional Control Performance Report will be evaluated with the five-year review under 42 USC 9621(c). This report shall include information pertaining to any breaches to IC’s, corrective actions taken, and any property transfer. The Air Force will, with landowners consent, implement, monitor, maintain, and enforce the onsite remedies selected in this ROD. Louis Howard
12/20/2010 Update or Other Action Draft Groundwater Monitoring Report received. On behalf of the Air Force, the Native Village of Port Heiden (NVPH) and Boretide Consulting have developed this Draft Groundwater Monitoring Report. Three groundwater Areas of Concern (AOCs) are under investigation in the Port Heiden vicinity. These three groundwater AOCs are identified as follows • The Former Port Heiden RRS area • The FPC-066 area • The FPC-215 area The Former Port Heiden RRS area has two distinct plumes; one Petroleum, Oils, and Lubricants (POL) plume and one TCE plume. FPC-215 has only a POL plume. FPC-066 also has only a POL plume. Individual wells and septic tank systems are used by most homes in Port Heiden. The school operates its own well and treatment system. Monitoring wells were purged via low flow methods prior to sampling. Static water levels were measured before purging and in wells that produced adequate water; at least four well casing volumes of water were screened and removed prior to sample collection. Several wells however, were very poor water producers, even under low flow conditions. These wells were very slowly purged dry, allowed to recharge, and sampled thereafter. Former RRS GW MW When opened, it was discovered that each of the groundwater wells to be sampled at the Former RRS had a dedicated 12-volt pump and associated tubing. This fact was unknown when sampling preparations were made, and the field crew had arranged for a Grundfos pump and an adequate amount of tubing to be sent to the site. However, the Grundfos and the additional tubing would ultimately be required. When sampling each of the Former RRS wells, the field crew attempted to purge water via the dedicated pumps. An attempt to do so was made at each well, but in all cases, the dedicated 12-volt pumps no longer worked properly. The pumps and tubing were thus pulled and the wells were purged/sampled with the Grundfos or, in the case of wells that would not produce adequate water, dedicated bailers were used. Upon inspecting the impeller section of the removed, dedicated pumps, each appeared to be heavily fouled by scum/microbial growth. Iron precipitates were apparent in several wells too. These dedicated pumps and the tubing found in each well were ultimately disposed in the community landfill. The new tubing was then dedicated and left behind in each well so as to be available during the next sampling event. FPC-066 GW MW Four monitoring wells were sampled at the FPC-066 AOC in 2010. As the historical source of contamination at this location was a diesel spill, each well was analyzed for diesel-range organics (DRO). The risers in each well were completed with 1.5-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC) whereas the wells at the Former RRS were all completed with 2-inch PVC risers. This restricted diameter would not accommodate the Grundfos sonde. As such, these wells were sampled with dedicated Waterra foot valves. Dedicated tubing was also used for each well, thereby negating the need to decontaminate groundwater sampling equipment. The foot valves and tubing were left in each well for the next sampling event. FPC-215 GW MW Three monitoring wells were sampled at the FPC-215 AOC in 2010. Each well was analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes (BTEX), and DRO. As was the case at FPC-066, the risers in each well were also completed with 1.5-inch PVC. Accordingly, these wells could not accommodate the Grundfos sonde either. Each of these three wells was thus sampled with dedicated Waterra foot valves and dedicated tubing. The foot valves and tubing were left in each well for the next sampling event. Results Former RRS: TCE ranged from 0.0056 mg/L to 0.69 mg/L (0.005 Table C cleanup level), Aroclor-1260 was detected in PG1-MW-01 at 0.0056 mg/L (cleanup level is 0.005 mg/L), GRO was not analyzed, DRO was detected at 17 mg/L in BLO-MW-01 (cleanup level is 1.5 mg/L) and RRO was detected at 2.3 mg/L (cleanup level is 1.1 mg/L). FPC-066: MW-05 4.5 mg/L DRO (cleanup level is 1.5 mg/L) FPC-215: MW-09 9.68 mg/L DRO (cleanup level is 1.5 mg/L) General recommendations: continue monitoring at all wells on an annual basis and add chloride as a parameter for MNA at the Former RRS. Louis Howard
12/20/2010 Update or Other Action Draft Site Characterization Report received. The Native Village of Port Heiden (NVPH) & Boretide Consulting have authored this Draft Site Characterization Report on behalf of the Air Force. The NVPH began excavation, removal, & off site disposal of known site soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Additional soil delineation occurred concurrent to these excavation activities during 2010. With impacted soil boundaries now more tightly defined, these excavation & disposal efforts will accelerate during the 2011 field season. Nine impacted soil Areas of Concern (AOCs) are under investigation. These nine soil AOCs are identified as follows • The Black Lagoon Outfall/Septic System Outfall (BLO/SSO) • Contaminated Soil Removal Area 1 (CSR1) • Contaminated Soil Removal Area 2 (CSR2) • The Drum Storage Area (DSA) • The Foundation Cover Soil/Pad Grid 1 Area (FCS/PG1) • Location 5 • The North Landfill Area (NLF) • The three Petroleum, Oils, & Lubricants (POL) Stockpiles • The Road between the Former RRS & the Airport Of these nine, soil sampling activities were performed on the following six AOCs during 2010. • The BLO/SSO • CSR1 • CSR2 • The DSA • The three POL Stockpiles • The Road between the Former RRS & the Airport Due to time constraints, no sampling activities took place at the following three AOCs. • The FCS/PG1 • Location 5 • The NLF For PCB contaminated soil, field screening was not utilized. As the various field screening kits available to evaluate the presence or absence of PCBs gain little favor with most regulatory agencies, it was instead decided to employ a 3-day turnaround time (TAT) with the laboratory. Suspected POL contaminated soil was field screened with a photoionization detector (PID) during excavation of the BLO/SSO septic tank & pipeline areas. As PCBs were the primary soil contaminant of concern (COC) during 2010, the PID was not used extensively. However, this will likely change during the 2011 & 2012 field seasons as POLs assume a much more prominent share of the COC mix. All four samples collected along the northeast side of the Former RRS Pad were beneath the PCB cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg. The next three samples were collected along the northwest side of the Former RRS Pad. Each of these three were above the 1 mg/kg level. One location fell within the DSA whereas the other fell within CSR1. The next three samples were collected along the southwest side of the Former RRS Pad. Two of these were above 1 mg/kg & would ultimately become part of CSR2. The remaining two samples straddled the center point of the southeast side of the Former RRS Pad. One sample was above 1 mg/kg & became part of CSR2 whereas the other sample had a PCB concentration less than 1 mg/kg. Road between Former RRS & PH Airport: several PCB results in excess of 1 mg/kg were also encountered on the road that leads south-southwest out of the Former RRS while CSR2 was being delineated. MHR-GS-001/MHR-SS-01 Location: Three locations between the Former RRS & the Airport & had PCB results above 1 mg/kg. These three locations were named as follows: • MHR-GS-001 / MHR-SS-01 • MHR-GS-003 / MHR-SS-03 (Truck Rollover Location) • MHR-GS-004 / MHR-SS-04 Drum Storage Area: The six DSA grid squares that exceed the 1 mg/kg PCB threshold when 2010 field activities concluded were each covered with a 15-foot square piece of reinforced visqueen & overlain with approximately 6-inches of clean fill. The field crew will return to these location in 2011 & complete the excavation/closure sampling at each gird square. DSA Debris Pile: Sampling activities at the DP were limited to 22 grid squares, NONE of which tested below 1 mg/kg for PCBs when field activities concluded in 2010. As will be seen, these 22 grid squares do not cover the entirety of the DP. It is anticipated this location will be closed during 2011 field activities & comprehensive grid sampling results & a waste disposal summary will be presented in the 2011 SCR. Septic Tank Excavation-no septic tank was found. Only COC was PCB from muck in the center of the concrete vault at 1.55 mg/kg. The remaining soil from which this was sample suite was collected was subsequently shoveled out of the vault & deposited in a PCB super sack. Trace soil that could not be removed from the vault surface was scraped & resampled for PCBs, which were not detected above 0.0947 mg/kg. Septic Pipeline Excavation: No stained, odoriferous soils, or other evidence of a release was encountered in either the septic tank or pipeline excavation locations in 2010. Historical data indicates POL & PCB contaminants exist in the BLO/SSO Areas. Excavation activities are planned for 2011. Specific actions shall be detailed in the upcoming rewrite of the Final Port Heiden RRS Remediation Work Plan. For additional information see site file. Louis Howard
1/5/2011 Report or Workplan Review - Other Staff reviewed & commented on the Draft GW Monitoring Report Former Port Heiden Radio Relay Station December 2010.General Comments For all draft & final reports, ADEC will require a separate cover page accompanying the document stating the: -Name & signature of “qualified person” responsible for collecting samples. -Name & signature of “qualified person” responsible for interpreting the data. -Name & signature of “qualified person” responsible for reporting the data. 1.0 Introduction Page 5 The text states: “In the next few years, it is anticipated the NVPH will have several members who become proficient with relevant regulations, hazardous material shipments, sampling techniques, surveying, remediation, reporting, & project controls that undertakings such as this require. Thereafter, it is the intent of NVPH & Boretide that outside contractor involvement will be minimized & the skills required to conduct similar projects will exist locally within the community of Port Heiden.” While experience & proficiency with relevant regulations, hazardous material shipments, sampling techniques, surveying, remediation, reporting, & project controls are desirable traits, these traits alone do not meet the ADEC requirements [18 ASAC 75.990] for a “qualified person” which the Air Force is required to employ as an impartial third party during such activities as well as the groundwater monitoring described in this document. The text states: “This Draft GWMR will be revised & finalized during the review process. All revisions are subject to NVPH, the United States Air Force (USAF) 611th Civil Engineer Squadron (611 CES), United States Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) & Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) approval” ADEC will request the Air Force provide all response to comments from all parties reviewing the document: USAF 611 CES, USCOE, NVPH, etc. This is to ensure that other party’s comments do not conflict with ADEC’s comments prior to finalizing the document. ADEC needs to review all changes to the report before ADEC will approve it. 2.2.5 Facilities The text states: “Individual wells & septic tank systems are used by most homes in Port Heiden. The school operates its own well & treatment system.” ADEC requests the Air Force provide clarifying text on whether or not there are drinking water wells in the vicinity (i.e. ½ mile radius of a contaminated site) of the three areas being monitored in this document: the Former Port Heiden RRS area, the FPC-066 area & the FPC-215 area. 3.1 Field Documentation Page 12 The text states: “All notes collected during field activities were either entered in the project logbook &/or inputted into the project database. The project database is an excel file that was accessed via the project laptop. Sampling results & survey coordinates were organized in this excel file when field activities concluded each day.” ADEC will require the Air Force to always include the notes collected during field activities entered in the project logbook &/or inputted into the project database with draft reports in both electronic & hard copy versions. There were no logbooks & project database files included with the draft groundwater monitoring report received by ADEC for review & comment. 3.2 Groundwater Field Screening Page 12 The text states: “Several wells however, were very poor water producers, even under low flow conditions.” ADEC requests the Air Force clarify which specific wells were poor producers even under low flow conditions. 3.3.1 Former Groundwater Monitoring Wells Page 14 The text mentions a field crew in several instances which conducted various groundwater sampling activities: “….the field crew had arranged for a Grundfos pump & an adequate amount of tubing to be sent to the site. When sampling each of the Former RRS wells, the field crew attempted to purge water via the dedicated pumps.” If the qualified person was not the actual person collecting the samples, developing the wells, then the qualified person must have been on site to supervise [as defined by 18 AAC 75.990 (125) the field crew during their work. ADEC requests the Air Force provide clarification in the text that the qualified person was actually present on-site during these field crew activities & providing direct supervision. Without the logbook or project database files it is not known who made up the field crew during the groundwater sampling activities described in this draft document. ADEC requests the logbooks & project database files be provided as soon as possible for its review & comment. For additional information see site file. Louis Howard
1/10/2011 Report or Workplan Review - Other Staff reviewed & commented on the Draft Site Characterization Report Former Port Heiden Radio Relay Station (RRS) December 2010. For all draft & final reports, ADEC will require a separate cover page accompanying the documents stating the: -Name & signature of “qualified person” responsible for collecting samples. -Name & signature of “qualified person” responsible for interpreting the data. -Name & signature of “qualified person” responsible for reporting the data. Highlight on all of the figures the locations of the soil contamination remaining at each area of concern (AOC) which are above cleanup levels. Introduction page 5: While experience & proficiency with relevant regulations, hazardous material shipments, sampling techniques, surveying, remediation, reporting, & project controls are desirable traits, these traits alone do not meet the ADEC requirements for a “qualified person” which the AF is required to employ as an impartial third party during such activities as well as the groundwater monitoring described in this document. 1.2 Document organization page 7: ADEC will request the AF provide all response to comments from all parties reviewing the document: USAF 611 CES, USCOE, NVPH, etc. This is to ensure that other party’s comments do not conflict with ADEC’s comments prior to finalizing the document. ADEC needs to review all changes to the report before ADEC will grant approval on the report. 2.27 Climate Page 11: ADEC requests the AF reference which zone Port Heiden RRS is in: Arctic Zone (as defined at 18 AAC 75.990), Under 40 inch Zone (site receives mean annual precipitation of less than 40 inches each year), or Over 40 inch Zone (site receives mean annual precipitation of 40 or more inches each year). 3.1 Field Documentation Page 12: ADEC will require the AF to always include the notes collected during field activities entered in the project logbook &/or inputted into the project database with draft reports in both electronic & hard copy versions. There were no logbooks & project database files included with the draft site characterization report or electronic files received by ADEC for review & comment. The Final NVPH Remediation Work Plan (July 2010) stated a logbook would be used for: 5.0 Sample Custody Requirements in this section apply to all samples collected for this NVPH project & are not limited to those samples collected to verify that a site meets cleanup guidelines. 3.2 Soil Field Screening Page 13: ADEC requests the AF clarify when the PID was used, what the results were of the field screening & when laboratory samples were taken based on field screening or best professional judgment of the “Qualified Person”. Typically, these screening activities are also described in the field logbook/notebook which was not included with the draft site characterization report for review. 3.3 Soil Sampling Page 13: Figure 3 does not show the spacing between grids. ADEC requests the AF amend the figure to show the distance between grids (appears to be 5') as well as the distance between the mid-point to each of the grid (no more than 2 ½'). 4.2 Drum Storage Area Page 23: The text states: “On average, soil was removed from each of these 96 DSA grid squares in 1' lifts until the associated PCB analytical result was less than 1 mg/kg. Sometimes up to 2' were removed in a given lift when PCB concentrations exceeded ~100 mg/kg. But as these contaminant levels entered single digits, lifts were frequently less than 6" thick.” It appears a standard operating procedure needs to be incorporated (& followed) into the revised work plan regarding when lifts will deviate from the 1' depth since the methodology above does not reflect what was approved in the final work plan. ADEC will require the AF to describe in detail in the text or on the figure’s Sample Results Key (suggest another column be added called Depth) what the depth of each lift was during excavation for all areas referenced in the document. If one lift was excavated, then describe in detail, the depth of excavation in all cases. If multiple lifts were excavated, then describe in detail for all lifts: the depth of each lift excavated & the rationale for either decreasing or increasing the depth of the lift being excavated. In the future it is highly recommended that the AF use a minimum soil thickness of 10" of compacted soil to temporarily cap PCB contamination to at least make an effort to comply with 40 CFR 761.61(a)(7) Cap Requirements. For additional information see site file. Louis Howard
4/12/2013 Update or Other Action Draft Site Investigation and Treatability Study Work Plan received for review and comment. Site Investigation. The investigation will fully characterize the vertical and horizontal extent of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and petroleum, oil and lubricants (POL) contamination at the Black Lagoon Outfall through an adaptive drilling program of up to 84 boreholes and 500 soil samples. The investigation will also screen for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), to verify that they are nonexistent in the investigation area. PCE Treatability Study. The study will excavate up to 3,500 cubic yards (cy) of the most highly contaminated soil identified during the site investigation. Two onsite biopiles will be constructed with the soil and will be evaluated for declines in contaminant concentrations over the course of a year. Louis Howard
5/5/2014 Update or Other Action Site Inspection Report (draft) received for review and comment. Jacobs performed the following tasks in 2013: • Advanced 58 soil borings and collected 294 primary soil samples from these borings to delineate the extent of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products, gasoline-range organics, diesel-range organics, residual-range organics, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). • Modeled the extent of PCE contamination based on 2013 soil boring sample results for use during the execution of the Treatability Study. • Identified PCB contamination within the first 0.5 feet in 4 soil borings then delineated the extent of contamination and excavated 117 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated soil. • Conducted a land survey of all the soil boring locations and grid corners. Based on the results of the 2013 field effort, the following activities will be conducted in 2014: • Excavate at least 32 additional cubic yards of PCB-contaminated soil identified in 8 grids in 2013. These grids will be excavated until confirmation floor samples are below cleanup level prior to beginning Treatability Study efforts. • Excavate up to 3,500 cubic yards of PCE-contaminated soil from the Black Lagoon Outfall for two passively-vented biopiles, which will be constructed as part of a Treatability Study. Conclusions: Soil borings were advanced to delineate the lateral and vertical extent of PCE-contaminated soil at the Black Lagoon Outfall near the former RRS in Port Heiden, Alaska. Twenty-two soil borings contained PCE above the 0.024 mg/kg ADEC migration to groundwater cleanup level with the maximum detected concentration of 2.1 mg/kg. Exceedances of DRO (19 borings), and TCE (6 borings) also existed, and are co-located with PCE exceedances in most cases. Modeling of the PCE-contaminated soil plume based on soil boring data estimates that 3,281 cy of PCE-contaminated soil above the cleanup level from 0 to 20 feet bgs remains in situ at the Black Lagoon Outfall. In the 2014 field season, up to 3,500 cy of soil with the highest concentration of PCE contamination are scheduled to create two passively ventilated biopiles as part of the TS component of this project. PCB contamination above the cleanup level was discovered at four soil boring locations at 0 to 0.5 feet bgs. Because PCB-contaminated soil cannot be remediated via biopile technology, PCB removal prior to excavation of PCE-contaminated soil was necessary. The Black Lagoon Outfall was delineated via sampling and subsequent excavation of 15-foot by 15-foot grid cells, which resulted in the removal of 117 cy of PCB-contaminated soil in 2013. Twenty-one excavation confirmation samples were collected from 21 grid cell floors and analyzed for PCBs. Four of these confirmation samples had results above the PCB cleanup level. A total of 8 grid cells remain above the PCB cleanup level (four grids cells from the soil boring results and four grid cells from excavation confirmation sampling), for an estimated 32 cy of PCB contaminated soil remaining onsite. The remediation of these grid cells is scheduled for 2014 removal prior to the PCE-contaminated soil excavation for the Treatability Study. Louis Howard
5/6/2014 Report or Workplan Review - Other Staff provided comments on the draft site inspection report. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation’s Contaminated Sites Program staff (ADEC) received the draft document on May 5, 2014 for review and comment. ADEC has reviewed the document and concurs with the statements regarding the need for remaining field work for PCE contaminated soil via biopiles and removal/disposal of PCB contaminated soil at an approved off-site permitted facility. ADEC disagrees that the cooler “Feldspar” elevated temperatures of 9 (temp blank) and 9.9 degrees C (cooler temp) had minimal impact on VOC (methanol and low-level) results. The results will not be accepted for closure or confirmation sampling results to demonstrate that soil meets applicable cleanup levels for any VOC. For “low-level” SW8260, EPA no longer recommends the sodium bisulfate preservative; instead, from this point forward, use VOC/VOA vials with a water carrier (OSWER 9240.0-47 EPA 540-R-09-03 Jan. 2011 CLP Guidance for Field Samplers-See App. B). Please provide one hard copy and one electronic copy of the final report for our files. Louis Howard
1/16/2015 Update or Other Action Draft Treatability Study received for review and comment. In the summer of 2014, approximately 3,800-cy of PCE-contaminated soil from the BLO near the Former RRS in Port Heiden, Alaska, was excavated and used to construct two passively vented biopiles. These biopiles were constructed with ventilation pipes and wind turbines designed to pull air through the structures and remediate the volatile contaminants by evaporation and bioactivity. Prior to the build, pre-construction samples were collected from the footprints of each biopile and from the access roads. Post-construction samples of the access roads were collected at the end of the field season. In order to provide a baseline for remediation, 15 samples were collected from the two biopiles at varying depths. Sample results demonstrate the soil in the biopiles contains DRO, PCE and TCE concentrations above ADEC Method Two migration to groundwater cleanup levels. In 2015, another set of samples will be collected from the biopiles to gauge the effectiveness of the remediation strategy. Louis Howard
1/29/2015 Report or Workplan Review - Other Staff provided comments on the Draft Black Lagoon Biopile Treatability Study, Port Heiden, Alaska dated January 2015 The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) has received the document on January 16, 2015 for review and comment. ADEC concurs with the recommendation to collect a second round of samples to evaluate the system efficiency of the biopile. The document may be finalized. Louis Howard
6/2/2015 Report or Workplan Review - Other The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) has received the Final 2014 Black Lagoon Biopile Treatability Study Report Port Heiden RRS dated May 2015 for CS DB Hazard ID 186). ADEC has no further comments on the final version of the document and approves the document. Louis Howard
4/13/2016 Update or Other Action Black Lagoon Treatability Study Report received. There were two Work Plan deviations for the TS. In 2014 and 2015, soil samples from the biopiles were not analyzed for PCBs and the lab reported the full list of analytes for low-level volatile organic carbon analysis, rather than just PCE and daughter products. In Worksheet #14, the Work Plan specified analyzing soil from the biopiles for PCE and daughter products, GRO, DRO/RRO and PCBs. In Worksheet #18, the Work Plan does not include PCBs as a requested analysis for biopile soils. These inconsistencies in the Work Plan may account for the deviation. There is no reason to suspect PCB contamination in the soil excavated for the biopiles since a full removal and verification of cleanup complete was performed at the BLO prior to excavation. In addition, the frequency of biopile inspections differed from the frequency outlined in the Work Plan. Although the biopiles were not inspected bi-weekly, no damage to the biopiles occurred during the winter of 2014/2015. As a remediation strategy, the biopiles are performing very well, particularly for PCE. However, at least one additional year of operation is needed to attenuate the soil to below ADEC cleanup levels for DRO and PCE. An additional round of sampling is necessary in 2016 to ensure further reduction of DRO and PCE concentrations. The biopiles can be decommissioned once concentrations of each contaminant fall below the ADEC cleanup levels. The possibility remains that DRO levels will not fall below the cleanup level, or that it will not occur in a timely manner. As such, two potential future actions are recommended for consideration. The first potential action is collection of total organic carbon samples from a non-DRO-contaminated area at Port Heiden for the purpose of calculating an ADEC Method Three alternative cleanup level for DRO (ADEC 2008). Alternative cleanup levels offer a risk-based and site-specific cleanup level based on background organic carbon soil content and other soil parameters. A second potential action involves landspreading or landfarming the remaining biopile soil (NVPH 2013). Landspreading and landfarming allow for greater diffusion of volatile contaminants out of soil and oxygen into soil. Higher diffusion rates allow for more rapid biodegradation during the summer months and, thus, faster reduction of DRO concentrations to the cleanup level. See site file for additional information. Louis Howard
4/20/2016 Report or Workplan Review - Other Staff reviewed and approved the treatability study for the Black Lagoon. Louis Howard
6/14/2017 Update or Other Action Draft Biopile treatability study report received for review & comment. In 2016, two passively ventilated biopiles were sampled to assess the effectiveness of biopiles as a remediation technique for PCE-contaminated soil in Port Heiden, Alaska. The biopiles were constructed in 2014 & were designed to promote the evaporation & removal of VOCs, including PCE & TCE, & to promote the biodegradation of petroleum-derived contaminants, such as DRO. In November 2016, the regulatory cleanup level for PCE increased from 0.024 to 0.19 mg/kg. All PCE & TCE sample results were below the November 2016 cleanup levels. Although DRO concentrations reported in analytical results decreased, some sample results were above the cleanup level. In 2017, Jacobs is expected to decommission the biopiles under a separate contract & to place the soil into landspreading areas. APCS will landfarm the soil through tilling & will collect samples at the end of the field season to determine whether cleanup levels have been met. See site file for additional information. Louis Howard
6/20/2017 Report or Workplan Review - Other Staff reviewed the treatability study report and provided comments. Main comments were to request naphthalene (SW8270-SIM), 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, vinyl chloride (SW8260 “low-level”) will need to be analyzed for in the final confirmation samples as part of the landspreading operation. These requirements are based on the exceedances of cleanup levels (18 AAC 75 Table B1 March 23, 2017) for these contaminants in soil as listed in the 2005 RI/FS for sampling during 2004 at the Black Lagoon Outfall. In addition to these contaminants, SW8260 low level analysis for vinyl chloride will be required. The results for all vinyl chloride analysis had limit of quantitation (LOQs) and detection limits (DLs) above the migration to groundwater cleanup level of 0.80 ug/kg. Louis Howard

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