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CS Lab Approval Program


What is the Contaminated Sites Laboratory Approval Program?

By regulation, any laboratory analysis of soil, air, or water required under the Division of Spill Prevention and Response must be conducted by a laboratory approved under the Laboratory Approval Program (CSLAP). Both the laboratory and the analysis method(s) in question must be approved by the CSLAP.


View List of Approved Labs

Information for Lab Operators

How do I get approved?

Labs can apply for approval electronically by submitting a completed application along with proof of existing NELAP and/or DoD-ELAP approval.

How do I renew my existing approval?

If a lab is applying for renewal of an existing approval, the lab must submit a completed application at least 30 days before the existing approval expires to avoid any lapse in approval status.

How do I report changes in my NELAP or DoD-ELAP status?

Changes in a lab’s NELAP or DoD-ELAP status should be reported to cs.lab.cert@alaska.gov as soon as possible. Labs are encouraged to contact cs.lab.cert@alaska.gov before any change in their status if the lab believes a change is imminent.

How do I get approval to modify a laboratory method?

Method modifications should be discussed with and approved by the lab’s accrediting body. If the modification is allowed by the accrediting body, it will be allowed by the CSLAP.

My lab has changed name, location, manger, etc. How do I notify the CSLAP?

In order to notify the CSLAP of these changes, please download the application form, check the “change in contacts or status” box, fill in the lab identification number and any information that has changed. Submit that form to cs.submittals@alaska.gov and the CSLAP will issue a revised approval and update the list of approved labs to reflect the change.


Updating this information will not change the approval expiration date.

Where do I go for questions about the AK101, AK102, and AK103 analysis methods?

Questions about the AK analysis methods are addressed to the CSP Chemist.

What information needs to be in a laboratory report?

Minimum requirements for lab reports are listed in the Lab Data and QA Policy Tech Memo.

Is there a charge or fee for becoming an approved lab?

No. There are no fees required for applying for approval or for receiving approval.


Information for Lab Customers

How do I choose a lab?

Choosing a lab can be an intimidating task and there is no one right way to do it.

If choosing a lab is completely new to you – the best place to start is to talk to your CS or PPR project manager. They will be able to help guide you through the process. You are going to want to consider a number of factors, such as analysis methods, analysis costs, shipping costs, shipping logistics, sample preservation, etc.

If you have experience hiring labs – The first step is to access the list of approved labs. Labs will have a listed primary accrediting body under NELAP or DoD-ELAP. Click the accrediting body link and it will bring you to their NELAP Lab Information page or the DoD-ELAP search engine. From there you can find the lab’s fields of accreditation and see if they match your project requirements. You are also free to call your CS or PPR project manager, but you may prefer to find a lab on your own.

How do I choose a method?

Analytical methods used on a project are listed in the Sampling and Analysis plan. When deciding which analytical method to use, you should review the Field Sampling Guidance, talk to labs to make sure the reporting limits for the method are below the project action limits (often the Table B1, B2, and C cleanup levels), and discuss the analytical methods with your CS or PPR project manager.

How do I understand my lab report?

Please refer to ADEC’s guidance on How to Interpret Laboratory Data.